Albuquerque Beekeepers

Urban beekeeping in New Mexico's largest city.

Anyone aware of this? This is at the federal level-

"Due to increasing concerns about antibiotics in the human diet, FDA has established new rules.  Under these, all antibiotics to be used in beehives will have to be obtained through a veterinarian.  These rules were scheduled to begin this year - 2017.  At this point in time, some beekeeping organizations and bee equipment suppliers are exploring a possible exemption for bees.  The large beekeepers will likely pay a fee to a veterinarian.  It's the small beekeeper who may be affected the most.  Obviously, one can't take your beehive in for a checkup.  And most veterinarians have little or no training in insect disease identification and management. "

Here's an explanation/link from Michigan:

https://pollinators.msu.edu/bees-need-vets/

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Yup I was talking to my vet about it last year.  The national organization for veterinarians addressed it at their annual conference because you WILL have to have a "check-up".  My vet didn't know much about bees but wasn't willing to write prescriptions without inspecting the animal in question.

So vets will either have to trust their clients, or they are going to have to learn about bees and the bacterial diseases that affect hives REAL quick!!

(For what it's worth my vet thinks it's stupid, but then we got off on a tangent about the federal government and how Trump was going to save the universe, so.... haha)

Maybe the bees groups need to develop a flyer to be sent to the State Veterinary Board, and to random vets...There's also a national vet sign up list, and there isn't anyone from New Mexico on it.

http://beevets.com/

Well the only bacterial pests are the foulbroods. If you have American foulbrood you are NOT going to be treating with antibiotics - that hive has to be burned and destroyed. (That's required. By law in some areas.)

Terramycin is given seasonally as a PREVENTATIVE for the foulbroods. Most of us backyard beekeepers go out of our way to NOT dump unneeded antibiotics into our hives and so most of us won't be pursuing antibiotic prescriptions.

It's more of a commercial beekeeper issue because they load up all their hives and truck them around the US, where they mingle with who knows what other bees. So twice a year they are given this preventative antibiotic.

Because so much of our agriculture system relies on these preventative antibiotics as just part of the way they do things, there are a lot present in our food and water.  In response the FDA is cracking down on their use in food animals by requiring a veterinarian doctor to be involved and eliminating the opportunity for a farmer (or beekeeper) to go get antibiotics at the feedstore and mix and deliver them himself.

Info on the bacterial pests of honeybees:


If you get American Foulbrood, that hive MUST be destroyed, as it is extremely contagious and the spores can remain for decades.
If you get European Foulbrood, you may be able to feed & requeen that hive and pull through.

Antibiotics are not given to treat either of the infections, only as a preventative.


http://caes2.caes.uga.edu/bees/disorders/bacterial.html

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